Tagged: germany

Western Germany

FREIBURG

We came into Freiburg via France on Flexibus. We jumped into a taxi and headed towards the Hertz just south of the city to pick up our rental car. When we got there there it was closed with a sign on the door saying the address moved but no new address was provided, just a phone number. Our driver offered to call for us but no answer. Luckily a fork lift man nearby knew the new location so we jumped back in the taxi and drove to the airport location. A 40€ taxi total. Without having to get nasty the teller at Hertz offered to refund us for our full taxi and he upgraded us to a BMW 320 Diesel, Luxury Edition. Black with caramel colored leather interior. Perfect German car for Germany. A 5 day rental for $134.

We parked in Altstadt, the old section of Freiburg. We had lunch at Hausbrauerei Feierling, a recommended beer garden. Nick’s first Germany biergarten. We had the white and red sausages with a pretzel and house beer. I loved the white sausages which were simply boiled and came with a whole grain honey mustard. The beer was also exceptional.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After we walked to Freiburger Munster, which happened to have a food market going on around it. Lots of sausage stands. On the walk back to the car we went through the university campus and discovered the thousands of bicycles not chained up. A trustworthy town.

 

TRIBERG

We hopped in the car and drove 1 hour to Triberg, the original birth place of the Coo-coo clock. The Main Street is short with a few clock stores, including the House of 1000 Clocks. All the clocks are made locally and range from $10-20,000. There were traditional ones and modern contemporary ones. We ended up buying a small clock from a clock store nearby. Black with a green coo coo bird.

 

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We drove the Autobahn north and at one point clocked 155 miles per hour.

Dinner was Chinese food at Saigon Restaurant in Karlsruhe. The menu was extensive and in German only; the Asian owner did not speak English. Google translate came into play and took quite a bit of time.

 

LAMBRECHT (Black Forest)

We spent two nights in this small town with family friends of Nicks’. Thursday morning we had breakfast then went on a full-day hike with about 12 Germans, all friends of theirs. It was a German holiday, “Father’s Day.” A bit different in ours in that it’s just about being out with your kids.

The group left the house and walked directly into the Palatinate Mountains from Lambrecht around 11:30am and walked out of the mountains at Neustadt at 8:30pm. While trekking we took many stops to drink white wine spritzers, a traditional drink in this area. In total the group drank over 20 bottles of white wine. Three of the stops were restaurants and four were shacks or look-out points along the trek route.

To our luck the first restaurant had a traditional live band which was a rarity. We sat at long tables and the locals swayed and sang along to almost all the songs. At all the stops we ate liverwurst, blood sausages, salami and brown bread, all traditional German foods. At the second restaurant we ordered rounds of tarte flambe, German/French pizza, thin baked pizza dough topped with cream and ham bits. The cream was a bit much for me but everyone else loved it.

 

 

 

When we finished our hike in Neustadt we took the train one stop back to Lambrecht.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BADEN-BADEN

In the morning we drove back south to Baden-Baden, a high end town in the Black Forest often visited by presidents and princes, famous for its traditional Bath Houses. Nick and I went to Friedrichsbath, the more traditional of the two. The bath house is a historic bathing temple that has been around for over 130 years, and resembles those from Roman/Turkish bath houses. Grand in size and design. Walls of marble, ceilings of stained glass, and side walls adorned with roman sculptures and paintings.

We went on a coed nudist day where clothing is not optional. Men and women walk around freely (and together) in the nude with no hesitations or fear of body appearance, something I bet we’ll never see in the US. The bath house has 17 stages of pool/saunas. We chose the 50€ package which included the baths, a soap scrub and a cream massage. Our experience timed by stations went as follows- Shower, warm air, hot air, shower, soap body scrub, shower, steam, hot steam, full bath, whirlpool bath, exercise bath, shower, cold bath, towel down, cream massage, tea room.

After we sipped peppermint tea on the terrace in the reading room in our bath sheets we changed and headed out into the town.Pizza at Lifestyle cafe across from the bath house, then gelato from Martinelli Gelato down in the town center.

Then back in the car for a 1.5 hour drive north to Heidelberg.

 

 

 

 

 

 

HEIDELBERG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(View from dorm)

In Heidelberg we stayed at Steffi’s Hostel in a 10 bed dorm. Both got top bunks and baked in the overnight heat but overall the hostel was clean and spacious.

We were only there for one night but we had the chance to walk along the river during sunset which was lovely. We watched the locals sail, crew and socialize in the park across the river. Heidelberg is a university town so almost everyone on the streets was in their 20s.

We walked through the old town and down to Untere Strauss, the bar street. We had Italian for dinner at Pop restaurant. Great lemon-y carpaccio, overdressed arugula salad, and mediocre pasta. Not the best food but when the outdoor tables cleared for the night to begin we lucked out. The manager saved us the only 2 seat raised bench on the side of the bar; the perfect location for privacy and people watching while still being in the scene. In the morning we checked out and stopped at a bakery for bazaar pastries (a pretzel covered in dried cheese and pepitas.) We then hit the road for our 2.5 hour drive west.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NURBURGRING

I brought Nick to Nurburgring for the 24 Hour Zurich Race for his birthday present this year.

We got to town and hit the grocery store for snacks and beer. The town was packed as expected, and completely out of ice, which we should have guessed. Also turns out people can bring anything into the race, something we were unaware of. But also turns out good and drink costs are not astronomical there like they are at stadiums in the US.

The race went from Saturday at 3:30pm to Sunday at 3:30pm. We were there from 3:30pm to midnight Saturday.

 

 

 



We slept in our car and woke-up at 7:30am and hit the road.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRANKFURT

 

 

 

Our last day/night was spent in Frankfurt. We stayed at Frankfurt Hostel hotel which is located across from the train station, and happens to be the red light district and Chinatown area. We upgraded to a private double room for 58€ versus 18€ per person for a bunk bed.

It was too early to check-in when we arrived so we headed for Chinese nearby at Jade restaurant. It was Sunday after all. Shrimp dumplings, hot and sour soup, chicken with broccoli and sweet and sour chicken. Right on queue.

We had originally planned to skip doing a night in Frankfurt but I discovered a Food & Wine festival going on over the weekend so I re-planned. Fressgass-Fest ended up being a semi-bust. We walked down Kaiserstrauss, a boulevard full of different ethnic restaurants with outdoor seating, to Fressgass street, which ended up being unpopular, at least on this Sunday. The festival was about 3 blocks long and consisted of different food vendors and bars (cocktails bars, champagne bars, and beer only bars) with picnic tables set-up in the street. I started with a mug of champagne and ended with a gin basil smash. Drinks and food were delicious but overpriced throughout the event. We only stayed a few hours but it didn’t look like it was going to pick-up as the night went on. But it was Sunday after all.


We walked home and took a brief nap in the park next to the Main Tower on our way back to the hostel.

Our last evening we met up with a friend of my brothers who is German and lives in Frankfurt. He picked us up and we walked to his favorite beer store nearby. The store was a small convenience store that has two high top tables out front for drinking. Did I mention it’s legal to drink in the street in Germany? I had the local cider which was exactly as I like it- bitter and not sweet. According to our friend it’s common for German girls to mix it with water or Fanta because it’s not sweet enough.

We were then taken on a very nice river Main and old town walking tour. We crossed the river Untermainbrucke and back on the old Eiserner Steg bridge that leads into the old town. We were on the river at sunset and had gorgeous views of the Frankfurt Cathedral. We stopped at an outdoor restaurant in the old town and downed delicious Schnitzel with green sauce, carrot soup and a grilled salmon salad under large umbrellas while it rained around us.


Our last morning in Europe we were lucky enough to find an indoor food market while walking around the old town. Prosciutto paninis, cherry tomatoes and a coke for our last meal.

On the walk back to the car we walked into a pet store (the fourth of the trip) and found some perfect toys for Coleman, including a squeaky sausage which I’d been searching for.

Perfect last morning for the perfect trip.

We flew Condor airlines direct back to Austin.

Danube River Cruise

 This year Dave, Bob and I did our first European river boat cruise together. Last summer Viking River Cruises was having a 2-for-1 sale so we decided to venture out from the usual university trips and try something new. The Viking River cruise ships are much bigger than anything we have done before, our trip had 188 guests on board. Although the ship accompanies a lot of people the layout is the same, two levels of rooms with the dining room and bar/lounge on those levels as well. There’s a third bottom level where the staff sleeps, and there’s a rooftop deck that spans the whole boat. The rooftop is covered in turf and has lounge chairs, tables and chairs, a life size chess set, and a shuffleboard court. 

 With this group we had at least four coaches for daily excursions instead of the one or two that we’re used to. There’s too many people on board to meet everyone, which makes the trip less intimate. Also, many of the daily activities, like a music concert and bike riding costs extra; and alcohol is not included in the price. All our previous trips have been all inclusive, but they have also been much pricier so I can’t complain.

Passau, Germany

We did a Danube River cruise from Passau, Germany, to Budapest, Hungary. The three of us took the train from Munich to Passau. Here we got a taxi which was driven by an older Bavarian woman. She drove us down the river to the far port where we boarded the ship. About an hour later the ship moved ports to be in the Old Town in Passau. After dinner Dave and I left the ship and walked through the town. It turns out it’s a university town full of young people. The Old Town is incredibly cute with a bunch of cobble stone streets. There is a long pedestrian shopping street and in general everyone looked very cheerful. It was a Monday night and the Irish pub the boat staff recommended to us was closed, so instead we just wandered.

The next morning we did a walking guided tour of the Old Town. A lot of the windows have painted trimming instead of the usual stonework which was a bit odd.    
That afternoon the boat cruised down towards Linz. Dave and I went to the roof deck and played shuffleboard; it was my first time playing and I loved it. The scenery was amazing. Deep greens hills, wooden country houses along the lake, and random bike riders peddling along the river road. The sun was hot and the drinks were cold. The boat had to cross two locks on the way down and I was able to touch the bridge as we passed under one. 

Linz, Austria

After dinner Dave and I walked through the the downtown city area of Linz. It was a Monday night and the city was pretty quite. We found ourself on an endless shopping street. We ended up in Sax bar, which ended up being a gay bar. There was a drunk dog owner and I took the leash to play with the dog. We got back to the ship and finished watching The Sound of Music which we had started earlier. 

   [After Salzburg the next day Dave and I walked back into Linz and got haircuts. We went to a nice place but our hairdressers seemed untrained and we both walked out with German-looking hair. My girl did not know how to properly layer or angle and my hair is stiff and dead straight across in the back.] 

 

Salzburg, Austria

The next morning we took a two hour bus ride to Salzburg. Along the way we had a rest stop at a restaurant overlooking a lake. The alps were in the background and it was the most amazing view. We sat and sipped coffee taking it all in. 

 We were dropped off in the New Town of Salzburg and with our audio tour walked across the bridge and into the Old Town. The Sound of Music was filmed in Salzburg and I was incredibly excited to see many of the places they filmed. We saw the fountain and arbor where Do Re Me was filmed, as well as the hotel Julie Andrews stayed at while filming. 

    Mozart was from Salzburg. We saw his birthplace which is a yellow apartment building on the main shopping street in the Old Town. We also walked past his residence which is a pink house in town. Many places in Salzburg are named after him. There’s the Mozart Hotel, the music school, the restaurant, the bar, the park, a statue, etc. 

 Each of the stores in the old town has an iron sign that represents what the store originally sold. Many people used to be unable to read and therefor pictures were useful. There’s a key for key store, dressed women for the clothing shop, a Lion for Lions den bar (which is now McDonald’s,) etc. 

 After walking with the group we set out on our own and took the tram up the mountain to the fort. We had lunch at the outdoor cafe on the top overlooking the city. We tried to do the interior tour but the wait was too long so instead we walked around the exterior.      Back in town we met up with the group at the square where Cafe Tomaselli Seit 1703 is. It’s the oldest coffee shop in Salzburg. Before getting back on the bus I stopped at the farmers market and bought tomatoes to snack on.   

 

Melk, Austria

In the morning we took a walking tour of the Stift Melk abbey. The exterior of the abbey is traditional with great views of the Danube River and the town below. The interior of part of the abbey has been turned into a museum with neon lights. 

     The tour stopped at the library which had floor to ceiling bookshelves which reminded me of the library in Beauty and the Beast. Then we went through the church and were able to stand in the back and observe the end of a prayer; locals sat in the benches. When the priest was finished speaking Bob walked all the way down the aisle and asked the priest if he knew where the toilets were. 

There was an optional 30km biking excursion from Melk port to Durnstein port which about twenty of us younger-ish folk opted to do while the boat cruised down. Dave and I started last and went to the right, which we saw the group do as well but we were no longer with them. About fifteen minutes down the river pathway we went onto a bridge that crossed over the Danube. We decided to stop and take a photo on the bridge, and then also to check google maps to make sure there would be another bridge eventually so we could get back onto the right side of the river. It turns out we were going in the opposite direction, we were going towards Linz and not Vienna. We also realized that neither one of us knew which town our ship was docking at. We peddled back to our ship and discovered that it had already left. Luckily there was a different Viking ship there so they called and found out all the details for us, and gave us directions how to get onto the river path going in the right direction, towards Vienna.  

The road to get out of Melk was very confusing. We thought we finally figured it out and then we ended up in an army area and had to turn around again. Eventually we made it to the scenic bike path along the river. Along the 30km we drove past a castle, a few small villages, and through a lot of forest. On the other side of the river there were ruins of castles, farming along the mountains, and a few slightly bigger towns. The last hour or so of the trip we rode through vineyards, specifically the Gruner vineyard which is the wine we’d been drinking frequently on the ship. We also passed many apricot and peach farms but they weren’t ripe yet. 

  
 Luckily our GPS worked because there were absolutely no signs for Durnstein. We reached a playground near the waterfront and immediately realized we were on the wrong side of the river and there were no bridges anywhere nearby- we saw our Viking ship on the other side. Luckily there was a motorboat ferry that we were able to take across. We saw the group of bikers approach the ship and it turns out we made it (sort of) before they did. I played in the playground and we admired the view of Durnstein before we took the ferry across. The captain of the ferry was a British guy from London; we chatted with him for a while. 

  
  We dropped off the bikes then headed for a stroll through Durnstein, a tiny village on the hill. Many of the shops made their own apricot schnapps, so we made sure to try a shot. We wandered around and discovered that one man owns almost all of the property including the five star hotel.

We came back to the ship and played shuffleboard. We even got Bob to play with us and it turns out he’s great and be beat both of us. He did injure himself once by banging his thumb against his hip- OPP (old people problems.)  

Vienna, Austria
We woke-up in Vienna, one of the most beautiful cities I have ever seen. Almost every single building is old and ornate. We did a bus tour along the famous Ringstrasse. We passed the Opera House, which is famous for Mozart performing there, the Imperial garden, Parliament, Town Hall, the last remains of the city wall, a votive church with a double tower facade, and more. 

        We then got out of the bus for a walking portion. We walked into Place Maria-Theresa, then Heldenplatz. We saw the Archbishop of Vienna giving a speech outside; it happened to be a religious holiday that day.

We walked past the city horse stables, and down the high end shopping street to Saint Stephan’s Cathedral. We didn’t get a chance to go inside the cathedral but we did sit at Do&Co coffee shop across and watched the procession with the archbishop go by. 

   That afternoon we went to Schonbrunn Palace, a UNESCO site. It is a former summer residence, most recently decorated during Maria Theresa in the 1740-50s. It has 1,441 rooms and we were able to see about ten of them. The palace is compared to Versailles and although the interior and exterior of the palace is vast, rich and beautiful, it cannot compare. 
     Later that evening we went to a Mozart and Strauss classical music concert in a Viennese palace, wiener borsensale, in the city. The musicians were occasionally joined by a ballet couple, and an opera singing couple. It seemed that all the performers were has beens, or just never made it; not to say they weren’t talented. 


Bratislava, Slovakia

The next morning we woke-up in Bratislava and had a bus and walking tour. We first went to a palace on the hill, then into the old town. A few buildings were run down but it still looked like many other old European towns with small streets and tourists shops. After the group tour we walked on our own down a tree lined plaza and stopped at Good Mood coffee shop where they gave us creamy coffee topped with ice cream when we ordered iced coffees. 

  
     
That afternoon we spent on the roof deck of the ship playing shuffle board and sun bathing while we travelled down the river. We entered into a massive lock and another Viking boat came in next to us. Together we sank at least 60 feet before the opposite lock doors opened. 

 Budapest, Hungary

That night was the Captains farewell cocktails and dinner, then at 10:15pm the whole ship gathered on the roofdeck to watch our entrance into Budapest. We were all decked out in jackets and blankets although it ended up being warm enough to walk around. The entrance was magnificent. The city completely lights up and sitting near the Danube is the Huge ornate Parliament building, as well as many grand churches and a palace. The view from our cabin that night was of the old Chain Bridge and the Buda Castle. 

    We woke up to the same great view of Buda from the Pest side of the Danube. In the morning we did a bus tour of the Buda side of the city, then did a walking tour through the old town. We stopped at Matthius Church which is one of my favorites of all time. The exterior and interior is decked out in different patterns. The exterior roof is decorated with colorful tiles, and the interior with bright colorful paint. 

     Right next to the church is Fisherman’s Bastion, which looks like a princess castle entrance. 

    We walked around the old town which was full of old colorful doors. Every apartment building had one. 

We then did a bus tour around Pest. After lunch on the ship we drove out into the country to Lazar Equestrian Park for the Puszta horse show. We sat and watched a performance and then rode on a carriage, I got the front seat. There was also a small farm area which had lambs with antlers and rainbow colored chickens. 

      After our last dinner on the cruise we watched a traditional Hungarian dance show. The men and women who performed wore traditional ballroom dancing outfits- tuxedos and princess gowns. When all the adults went to bed a few of us went out. Along the waterfront local teenagers and adults drank bottles of wine and/or vodka; this seemed to be the place to hangout. There’s no railing along the edge of the water and people get pretty smashed.

We walked right under the Chain Bridge to an outdoor bar. The bar was a mix of tourists and locals, and it drew a nicer crowd. We drank rose spritzes and took a shot of traditional Hungarian flavored liquor, which a lot of locals were drinking. We danced and I met a bachelorette group where the bridal party all wore white and the bachelorette wore red.

Budapest continued on next post…

Munich, Germany

 We landed in the airport and took Subway 8 to Marienplatz, the main town square in Munich. The ride was approx. 45 minutes. The city center square has the massive neo-Gothic new town hall as the focal point. The clock tower soars into the sky and the facade of the building is adorned with gargoyles. At noon we watched a figurine show below the clock. 

After we walked through the old town hall and down the pedestrian street to Hofbräuhaus, a massive beer hall. We sat in the patio out back. We each ordered a liter of beer and shared a big pretzel and a platter or sausages with sauerkraut. Although it seemed like a tourist spot most of the people sitting outdoors were locals. One table of guys was drunk singing German beer songs. There were women walking around in traditional outfits selling pretzels, and there was a traditionally dressed band with a harp and an accordion. 

   After lunch we walked over to Vikualiennarkt, an outdoor food market. It was Sunday and unfortunately that was closed along with all the shops in the city. There wasn’t much to do so we decided to make our way to the train station for our next destination. We bought tickets to Passau then boarded our train. After an hour we got off and boarded a bus, then another train. It was orderly and I felt like I was back in Asia, just on a much shorter commuting trip; it only took 2.5 hours to get to our destination.